Hailing from Minneapolis, 23 year old Call Me Karizma is far from your run-of-the-mill singer and rapper. A die-hard fanbase for such a young act is no mean feat but he amassed this strong online following by truly connecting with his audience, promoting self love and making it his mission to destroy the taboo of mental health. From a contentious upbringing with an alcoholic mother, Karizma has also always lived a sober and smoke-free lifestyle, supplementing the positive undertones of his music.  While his message is prevalent, his creativity also shines in spreading the message with his finely crafted music that sounds like the sweet spot between Twenty One Pilots and Eminem with a hint of pop; Karizma walks the line between hip hop and indie rock with aplomb.

The passion extends to his vibrant live shows, where he recently shared his vision and message across 24 cities on a sold out and self booked US tour, more proof that for every effort that he puts in, he gets in return from his loyal fans. His efforts are definitely turning heads and catching ears, with SoundCloud naming him an ‘Artist To Watch’, and his first EP of the year The Gloomy Tapes; Vol 1 achieving over 1.3 million streams to date. His music has also garnered over 13 million streams on Spotify, all without the aid of a single Spotify curated playlist.

Ahead of the The Gloomy Tapes; Vol 2, Karizma shares Life of the Party, adding to the chronicle of his life by using metaphors to symbolize life’s drawbacks and everyday struggles. It’s an upbeat yet melancholic track that has appeal in it’s pristine and catchy songwriting but also carries a deep message for those looking past the surface. Karizma balances the pessimism that this track draws from with a message of empowerment that allows for a deeper level of relatability and connection with the listener. Whether you’re listening for a catchy hook, a sharp instrumental or a powerful message, there’s something for every music fan in this.

On the motivation behind Life of the Party, Call Me Karizma states “I wrote Life of the Party for the kids who feel alone. To let them know it is okay to stay inside and be by yourself. This song is a sad anthem for the delinquents.”